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留言者: Air Max 2009 
 
There is no question that Tacopina ran into deep conflict-of-interest problems soon after steering Kerik into the Bronx admissions. Almost immediately, a federal grand jury was probing Kerik’s sworn statements in relation to his vetting by White House officials for the Homeland Security position.
2014-12-15 09:52:24

 
before holing out to New Zealand international Mitchell McClenaghan on the boundary off spinner Simon Kerrigan. I don't tell you now whether Joe will start on the day of the game because the rest of the players don't know yet. Soon I hope he recovers what he had. The changes are designed to emulate the emphasis on technique and skill in countries such as Spain where children are only allowed to play on adult pitches from under-14 level." said Levett. "Obviously the battle for us is to keep the quality for longer periods. To get four tries was pleasing to give us some momentum going into next week. 29:57 Corner, Conceded by Charlie Taylor. 65:29 Corner.
2014-12-15 09:16:05

 
Vermieter werden immer vor einer schwierigen Entscheidung, entweder den sauren Apfel bei脽en und "Buy-in" der richtigen Mieter, oder sitzen mit einem Hohlraum und die Kosten, die mit ihm zu kommen, zum Teil dank ihrer zunehmend Straf leer Raten Haftung.
2014-12-15 09:14:29

 
STORY WRITTEN FOR & USED WITH PERMISSIONPosted: April 16, 2014 SpaceX is pressing ahead for another attempt Friday to launch a Falcon 9 rocket carrying a commercial cargo craft bound for the International Space Station, setting up an Easter Sunday rendezvous and berthing. The Falcon 9 rocket inside its hangar at Cape Canaveral. Photo credit: SpaceXLaunch from pad 40 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station is targeted for 3:25:21 p.m. EDT (GMT-4). If all goes well, the Dragon cargo ship, loaded with nearly 5,000 pounds of equipment and supplies, will be grappled by the space station's robot arm around 7:15 a.m. Sunday and pulled in for berthing at the Earth-facing port of the forward Harmony module.Assuming an on-time liftoff and berthing Sunday, two station astronauts -- Steven Swanson and Rick Mastracchio -- plan to carry out a two-and-a-half-hour spacewalk Wednesday, April 23, to replace a computer processor in the lab's solar power truss that failed last week.SpaceX engineers had hoped to launch the Falcon 9 Monday, but the flight was delayed about an hour and a half before liftoff because of an internal helium leak in a system used to separate the rocket's first and second stages."During Monday??s launch attempt, preflight checks detected that a helium valve in the stage separation pneumatic system was not holding the right pressure," SpaceX said in a statement. "This meant that the stage separation pistons would be reliant on a backup check valve."No issue was detected with the backup valve and a flight would likely have been successful, but SpaceX policy is not to launch with any known anomalies. We have brought the vehicle back to horizontal and are replacing the faulty valve, as well as inspecting the whole system for anything that may have contributed to the valve not working as designed."Repairs aside, the weather outlook for Friday is less than optimal, with forecasters calling for a 60 percent chance of conditions that would violate launch safety rules.Going into the campaign, it was thought that SpaceX only had two opportunities to launch the Falcon 9 -- Monday and Friday -- or the flight likely would slip into June because of a variety of other station-related issues.But following the delay Monday, SpaceX, NASA and the Air Force Eastern Range agreed the company could make another launch try Saturday if the Falcon 9 fails to get off Friday. A Saturday launching, at 3:02:42 p.m., would result in a three-day rendezvous for the Dragon capsule with berthing expected on April 22.If that case, NASA managers said they would move up the computer replacement spacewalk to Easter Sunday.This is SpaceX's third commercial resupply mission under a $1.6 billion contract with NASA. Orbital Sciences holds a $1.9 billion contract to deliver supplies using its Antares rocket and Cygnus cargo ship. NASA is using the commercial cargo craft to make up for the retirement of the space shuttle.If the Falcon 9 gets off Friday or Saturday, the next Orbital Sciences resupply mission, the company's second operational flight, would take off June 10. If the Falcon 9 fails to get off by Saturday, the SpaceX flight would slip to around June 10 and Orbital would prepare for launch on May 6.STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.SpaceX ready for commercial launch for Orbcomm SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: June 19, 2014 Six compact spacecraft are set for launch Friday on a Falcon 9 rocket, setting the stage for the deployment a modernized fleet of communications satellites for Orbcomm, a New Jersey-based company that links far-flung transport vessels, research stations and other assets with their owners. SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket on the launch pad with the Orbcomm satellites. Credit: SpaceXEnclosed inside the nose cone of SpaceX's 22-story Falcon 9 launcher, the Orbcomm satellites are set for liftoff at 6:08 p.m. EDT (2208 GMT) Friday, beginning a 10-minute trip from the SpaceX's Complex 40 launch pad at Cape Canaveral to an orbit up to 466 miles above Earth at an inclination of 47 degrees.The weather outlook is iffy, with U.S. Air Force meteorologists predicted a 30 percent chance conditions over Florida's Space Coast will permit liftoff during Friday's 53-minute launch window.The main concerns are with showers and thunderstorms associated with a tropical wave churning in the Atlantic Ocean.The launch was scheduled for May, but SpaceX encountered a helium leak during a preflight test, triggering a month-long delay. Concerns with one of the Orbcomm satellites kept the mission grounded for an extra few days.The satellites will be released from a mounting ring, supplied by Moog Inc., atop the Falcon 9 rocket's second stage in a choreographed 20-minute sequence once the launcher's 10 Merlin engines finish their propulsive work.The first of the six Orbcomm OG2 satellites, built by Sierra Nevada Corp., will deploy nearly 15 minutes after liftoff. The spacecraft are programmed to release at preset times until the final satellite flies off the rocket about 35 minutes into the flight.The first opportunity to communicate with the spacecraft comes about an hour-and-a-half after launch during a pass over the U.S. West Coast, officials said. The satellites will also extend their power-generating solar panels and communications antennas.Friday's flight is the first act in a two-launch, 17-satellite deployment by SpaceX and Orbcomm this year. Orbcomm officials say the company's investment in the second-generation satellite fleet, which replaces the company's aging spacecraft already in orbit, is worth approximately $230 million.About $70 million in assets are aboard Friday's launch, according to Robert Constantini, Orbcomm's chief financial officer.Orbcomm is paying SpaceX $42.6 million for the two launches.Most of Orbcomm's existing first-generation, or OG1, satellites were launched more than 15 years ago. They have operated years longer than designed, officials said.The satellites offer two-way data links to help customers remotely track, monitor and control transportation and logistics assets, heavy equipment, oil and gas infrastructure, ships and buoys, and government-owned equipment, according to Orbcomm's website.Founded by Orbital Sciences Corp. in 1993, Orbcomm Inc. was spun off as an independent company in 2001.Marc Eisenberg, CEO of Orbcomm, said being so close to launch is a "pretty amazing feeling, considering we started financing the constellation in 2005." A technicians works on an Orbcomm OG2 satellite at its factory in Louisville, Colo. Credit: Sierra Nevada Corp.Orbcomm's 889,000 subscribers will rapidly see benefits from the launch, including reductions in the time it takes to transfer messages. Full exploitation of the OG2 system's upgrades, such as 24-hour near real-time service, larger message capacities, and greater geographic coverage, will come after Orbcomm's next 11 satellites launch later this year."A good way to look at it is six satellites give you OG2 coverage about 8 hours a day," Eisenberg said. "And then the other 16 hours a day, you've got OG1 coverage."Orbcomm decided to put six satellites on its first launch with SpaceX for a few reasons, according to Eisenburg. Six satellites will sufficiently fill Orbcomm's coverage gaps, and it allows ground controllers more time to focus on each spacecraft during post-launch commissioning."Our No. 1 goal is to fulfill the mission objective, and the mission objective is to fill the hole in the sky and bring the average message down significantly," Eisenberg said in an interview. "You need a minimum of five to fulfill the mission objective. You want to go a little more than give because you want to take one of those spacecraft and start drifting it to get a feel for how that works."It also eases insurance worries, Eisenberg said. Insurance companies charged a higher rate for the first launch than the second flight, when officials expect the risk of of a launch or spacecraft risk will be mitigated by the experience with the first mission.The first Orbcomm OG2 satellite was lost on a SpaceX Falcon 9 launch in October 2012, which suffered a first stage engine failure and burned more propellant than planned to make up for the mishap.The 2012 launch achieved its primary purpose of delivering SpaceX's Dragon supply ship to the International Space Station, but there was not enough fuel to put the Orbcomm secondary payload in the correct orbit.The rocket released the spacecraft in a lower-than-planned orbit, but officials said engineers were able to unfurl the satellite's solar panel and antenna, demonstrating two of the craft's riskiest post-launch milestones. The satellite burned up in Earth's atmosphere after three days in orbit.Although it was not a factor in the decision, launching just six oven-sized satellites on the Falcon 9 rocket also gives SpaceX plenty of margin to try to recover the booster's first stage in the Atlantic Ocean a few hundred miles northeast of Cape Canaveral.The Falcon 9's first stage, fitted with four carbon fiber and aluminum honeycomb landing legs, will reignite its engines after completing its job to boost the Orbcomm satellites into space.While the launcher's second stage continues firing to put the satellites in orbit, the first stage will autonomously fly itself back to Earth, reducing its velocity before falling into the sea. Recovery crews stationed near the landing zone will attempt to retrieve the stage intact.SpaceX wants to eventually fly its rocket boosters back to the launch site for reuse.The first stage from the Falcon 9's previous launch in April splashed down in the Atlantic as designed, but rough seas prevented crews from getting to the rocket before it was destroyed by waves."This time, we're going to have much more capable boats," Elon Musk, SpaceX's founder and CEO, told reporters in April. "We kind of got unlucky in that we landed the stage in the middle of a storm. It will also be landing in the water much closer to land than last time, so I think hopefully we'll avoid some of the deep ocean stuff." The six Orbcomm OG2 satellites set for launch Friday are mounted on an adapter ring before encapsulation inside the Falcon 9 rocket's 5.2-meter (17.1-foot) payload fairing. Credit: SpaceXThe six spacecraft launched Friday will expand Orbcomm's operational fleet to 26 satellites, Eisenberg said.Each second-generation satellite has six times the data capacity and twice the transmission rate of one of Orbcomm's existing satellites. A higher-power communications system on the OG2 satellites will allow customers on the ground to connect with smaller, less-expensive antennas, officials said."One satellite is going to make a big difference," Eisenberg said."For Orbcomm to continue to be successful ... we need to launch some satellites," Eisenberg told investment analysts in a May conference call.Orbcomm's satellite fleet flies in groups arranged in four orbital planes to provide global coverage. One of the orbital planes is almost vacant, Eisenberg said, and five of the six spacecraft aboard Friday's flight are destined to occupy that plane."There is a specific hole in the sky that we're going to fill, which is why it's going to be material to the service that we offer today," Eisenberg said. "We've been waiting to plug it for a long time. There are going to be a lot of excited customers."One of the six spacecraft will drift into another grouping of Orbcomm satellites, he said.Each spacecraft has a launch mass of 170 kilograms, or about 375 pounds. They are designed to function for at least 10 years.Sierra Nevada engineers will spend the first month after launch testing systems on the satellites, which use a new spacecraft bus. Sierra Nevada will turn over control of the satellites to Orbcomm 30 days after launch if there are no significant problems, allowing the company to begin testing of the communications payload manufactured by Boeing Co.Eisenberg expects a quick impact to Orbcomm's bottom line."Once they turn it over to us, we can test the network part of it and start communicating with the satellite through the Boeing portion," Eisenberg said. "They're all going to be jumping in and out of service, so they'll start have an affect at that point."Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: .STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.SpaceX ready to launch first Falcon 9 rocket of the year SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: January 5, 2014 SpaceX engineers at Cape Canaveral are finishing up preparations to launch a Falcon 9 rocket with a communications satellite for Thailand on Monday, just over one month after the Falcon 9's last mission from Florida. File photo of a Falcon 9 rocket on the launch pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. Credit: SpaceXMonday's launch window opens at 5:06 p.m. EST (2206 GMT) and extends more than two hours to 7:08 p.m. EST (0008 GMT), according to a SpaceX spokesperson and the U.S. Air Force. Deployment of the 6,649-pound Thaicom 6 satellite is expected 31 minutes after liftoff.The 224-foot-tall Falcon 9 rocket will be rolled to the launch pad and rotated vertical atop the launch mount at Cape Canaveral's Complex 40 launch pad ahead of the start of the countdown Monday morning.Fueling of the Falcon 9 rocket with liquid oxygen and RP-1, a highly refined kerosene fuel, will begin shortly after 1 p.m. EST (1800 GMT), with the final terminal countdown sequence programmed to get underway 10 minutes before liftoff.SpaceX worked over the holidays to ready the Falcon 9 launch pad after the company's successful Dec. 3 launch of the SES 8 television broadcasting satellite, marking the Falcon 9's first mission to geostationary transfer orbit, the desired position for most communications spacecraft.Officials delayed the launch from Friday to resolve a technical concern with the Falcon 9 rocket.Emily Shanklin, a SpaceX spokesperson, said the company would not attempt to recover the first stage from Monday's launch, giving Thaicom 6 all the power it needs to soar into a high-altitude orbit stretching as high as 90,000 kilometers, or 55,923 miles, from Earth.The rocket is shooting for an orbit with a targeted perigee, or low point of 295 kilometers, or 183 miles, and an inclination of 22.5 degrees.SpaceX hopes to make the Falcon 9's first stage reusable, eventually guiding the spent rocket stages back to a rocket-assisted touchdown on a landing pad near the launch site. Engineers tested the terminal phase of a first stage's return with a testbed named Grasshopper, which completed hops as high as 2,400 feet at SpaceX's rocket development facility in McGregor, Texas.On the Falcon 9 rocket's first flight from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Sept. 29, SpaceX attempted to recover the first stage with a controlled soft landing in the Pacific Ocean south of the launch site. The rocket re-ignited its engines to slow its speed for splashdown, but the first stage began spinning and the leftover propellant in the fuel tanks centrifuged outward and away from lines leading to the engines, causing a premature engine shutdown. Artist's concept of the Thaicom 6 satellite in orbit with solar panels and reflectors deployed. Credit: Orbital Sciences Corp.Before December's launch of SES 8, SpaceX founder and CEO Elon Musk said the Thaicom 6 launch may include a stage recovery demonstration in the Atlantic Ocean. According to Shanklin, SpaceX will not try the water landing demo with this mission.Monday's launch comes about a year later than scheduled when Thaicom, a public company partially owned by the Thai government and based in the Bangkok metropolitan region, announced the launch contract for Thaicom 6 in June 2011.Thaicom said in 2011 the Thaicom 6 project was a $160 million investment for the company, including the spacecraft, launch services and insurance.Thaicom 6's operator has sold more than 66 percent of the satellite's capacity, according to a Dec. 25 press release. Thaicom 6 will be positioned in geostationary orbit at 78.5 degrees east longitude, reaching customers across the Asia-Pacific and parts of Africa.The satellite, built by Orbital Sciences Corp., will provide the broadcast industry with improved television quality and additional high-definition channels, according to Thaicom. It carries 18 C-band and eight Ku-band transponders connected to three antennas.In May, Thaicom announced it acquired an unidentified satellite already in orbit to provide interim communications capacity from the 78.5 degrees east position while waiting for the launch of Thaicom 6.Fearing Thaicom 6 would not be launched to meet regulatory deadlines, Thaicom said the newly-acquired in-orbit satellite would ensure digital terrestrial television stations waiting to use Thaicom 6 complied with "must-carry" regulations requiring broadcasting by a certain date.Jonathan McDowell, an astrophysicist at Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics who tracks global satellite and launch activity, said the AsiaSat 7 satellite was the only candidate for the acquisition by Thaicom. It maneuvered into position last summer at 78.6 degrees east longitude, based on publicly available orbital tracking data, McDowell said.The launch of SES 8 required an in-flight restart of the Falcon 9's upper stage Merlin 1D engine, a tricky endeavor which failed on a test flight of SpaceX's upgraded Falcon 9 rocket in September.The launch of Thaicom 6 will duplicate the Dec. 3 flight, sending the 3.6-ton satellite to an orbit stretching more than 50,000 miles from Earth at its highest point. The mission will take about a half-hour from launch to spacecraft separation.It will mark the eighth flight of a Falcon 9 rocket since 2010, and the third launch of the launcher's newest version since its debut in September in a flight from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.The Falcon 9 has established a nearly perfect track record in seven launches to date, with the only blemish coming during an October 2012 launch when one of the rocket's nine first stage engines shut down prematurely. The loss of thrust doomed an Orbcomm communications satellite riding piggyback on the rocket, but the launch's primary payload -- a Dragon capsule bound for the International Space Station -- went on to achieve a successful mission. A view of the Falcon 9 rocket's nine Merlin 1D first engines inside the hangar at Cape Canaveral's Complex 40. This photo is from a previous mission. Credit: Kimbal Musk via TwitterThe upgraded Falcon 9, known as the Falcon 9 v1.1, uses upgraded Merlin 1D engines configured in a circular arrangement dubbed the "octaweb" and employs larger propellant tanks and more redundant avionics systems. It also features a simplified stage separation system, using three attachment points instead of 12, according to SpaceX founder and CEO Elon Musk.Hardware for Monday's launch, including the Falcon 9 rocket and Thaicom 6 satellite, was delivered to Cape Canaveral in late November and put in storage before the launch of SES 8 cleared room for technicians to begin fueling the spacecraft and assembling the two-stage booster.On Dec. 28, ground crews put the rocket through a full countdown rehearsal. The launch team loaded propellants into the Falcon 9 rocket and ended the countdown with a brief ignition of the first stage's nine main engines. The rocket remained on the launch pad in the grip of hold-down clamps.The final prelaunch assembly steps included attachment of the Thaicom 6 payload to the Falcon 9 rocket inside the SpaceX-built 17.1-foot-diameter payload fairing, which shields the spacecraft during the early phases of launch.Once engineers put the finishing touches on the 11.8-foot-diameter rocket, they will transfer the Falcon 9 to the launch pad along rail tracks from the horizontal integration hangar. A hydraulic lift system will hoist the rocket vertical after completing the approximately 600-foot rollout.Monday's launch opens a busy calendar of missions planned by SpaceX in 2014.A mix of missions for NASA and commercial satellites are on SpaceX's docket for this year. Here is a list of Falcon launches that could launch in 2014 after Thaicom 6:SpaceX will launch up to three resupply missions from Florida to the International Space Station using the company's Dragon cargo spacecraft. The flights would mark the third, fourth and fifth operational logistics launches under a 12-flight, $1.6 billion contract with NASA.Two Falcon 9 launches are planned from Cape Canaveral with a total of 17 small second-generation data relay satellites for Orbcomm.A pair of Falcon 9 rockets will launch from Cape Canaveral with the AsiaSat 6 and AsiaSat 8 communications satellites for AsiaSat of Hong Kong.Turkmenistan's first satellite, Turkmensat 1, will launch from Florida in late 2014 on a Falcon 9 rocket. The satellite is part of Turkmenistan's National System of Satellite Communications and was originally contracted to launch on a Chinese Long March rocket before SpaceX scored the launch in June 2013.The first test flight of SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket is scheduled to launch in 2014 from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The Falcon Heavy is powered by 28 engines, with 27 of the Merlin powerplants designed to ignite on the launch pad. SpaceX says it can loft up to 53,000 kilograms, or nearly 117,000 pounds, to low Earth orbit.Two critical tests for SpaceX's efforts to develop a crewed version of the Dragon spacecraft are on tap for 2014. One of the tests will simulate an aborted liftoff from the launch pad, with the Dragon's pusher escape thrusters taking the capsule away from a failing launch vehicle. Another demonstration, currently set for mid-2014, will test the Dragon's ability to escape its booster at the point of maximum aerodynamic stress about a minute after launching on a Falcon 9 rocket.The SAOCOM 1A radar observation satellite is scheduled to launch in late 2014 or early 2015 on a Falcon 9 rocket from California.Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: .John Glenn Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The historic first orbital flight by an American is marked by this commemorative patch for John Glenn and Friendship 7.Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is available in our store. Get this piece of history!Celebrate the shuttle programFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This special commemorative patch marks the retirement of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. --> | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.SpaceX reschedules next Falcon 9 launch for Nov. 18 SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: October 26, 2010 SpaceX has reset the launch of a crucial test flight of the Dragon capsule for no earlier than Nov. 18, giving engineers extra time to simulate the ship's brief but ambitious mission. The second Falcon 9 rocket undergoes a fueling test in September. Credit: SpaceXThe 10-day slip from the flight's last liftoff date, Nov. 8, is geared toward ensuring the mission has a better chance at success, according to SpaceX."We will launch when we believe the vehicle is ready and there is more testing that would yield a meaningful improvement in mission success," the company said Monday in a statement released to Spaceflight Now.The launch window on Nov. 8 was between 1430 GMT (9:30 a.m. EST) and 1752 GMT (12:52 p.m. EST). According to SpaceX, the Falcon 9 rocket has backup launch opportunities on Nov. 19 and Nov. 20. The schedule move leapfrogged a Nov. 15 Delta 4-Heavy rocket launch with a national security payload.If launch remains scheduled for Nov. 18, engineers plan to roll the 154-foot-tall Falcon 9 rocket to the launch pad for a preflight engine firing Nov. 13.The SpaceX launch team completed a fueling test of the two-stage rocket Sept. 15.But officials are not ruling out another delay."Dragon is an entirely new vehicle, making it impossible to predict exactly when all tests and verification of test data will be complete," the SpaceX statement said.SpaceX is processing their first payload with toxic hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide propellants at launch pad 40 at Cape Canaveral, Fla. Officials say they are taking extra precautions with the introduction of hypergolic fuel.The schedule uncertainty is focused on maximizing the odds of success on the Dragon test flight, which is slated to complete between one and three orbits of Earth, or last roughly two to five hours."We would like to do more integrated system testing including another in-depth round of hardware in the loop mission simulations to see if we can uncover any corner case problems," the statement said. "So far, it looks good, but we want to triple check."The upcoming flight follows a wildly successful first launch of the Falcon 9 rocket in June. That launcher carried a dummy Dragon capsule into orbit. The Dragon spacecraft mounted on a processing fixture inside the SpaceX hangar at Cape Canaveral, Fla. Credit: Brian Attiyeh/SpaceXSpeaking to reporters Monday at Kennedy Space Center, NASA's chief space operations official said SpaceX is working on verifying the interaction of the vehicle's software and hardware."They have some hardware integration tests where they check out their hardware with their software," said Bill Gerstenmaier, NASA's associate administrator of space operations. "They wanted some additional time to do that, so that's why they moved from the 8th to the 18th."SpaceX is developing the Dragon capsule and Falcon 9 rocket under an agreement with NASA. The design was completed using a mix of federal and private investment in the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services program, an initiative to procure U.S. spacecraft to deliver cargo to the International Space Station."They are doing all the right things," Gerstenmaier said. "They have got the right attitude of how to get ready for flight."Next month's mission is an all-in test flight of the Dragon, demonstrating for the first time its guidance and navigation system, orbit maneuvering thrusters, flight software, heat shield and parachutes.After launching into space aboard a Falcon 9 rocket and circling Earth a handful of times, the Dragon will drop back into the atmosphere and parachute into the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Los Angeles."They have a pretty aggressive first flight," Gerstenmaier said.The mission's success will determine whether NASA approves a SpaceX proposal to combine the next two Dragon demonstration flights in 2011. The baseline Dragon manifest calls for a second mission to approach the space station to check the craft's rendezvous systems, then a third Dragon spacecraft would be grappled by the outpost's robotic arm and berthed to the complex.SpaceX hopes to send the second Dragon flight all the way to the space station, accomplishing both flights' test objectives and expediting the first operational mission to delivery supplies.Dennis Stone, the manager of integration in NASA's commercial crew and cargo office, said the space agency will decide whether to consolidate the next two Dragon flights after reviewing the results of the November mission.The company has a contract with NASA for up to 12 cargo flights valued at up to $1.6 billion.STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.SpaceX resupply launch scrubbed by helium leak SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: April 14, 2014 The launch of a SpaceX's Dragon supply ship from Cape Canaveral was scrubbed Monday due to a helium leak in the Falcon 9 rocket's first stage. The next launch attempt will be no earlier than Friday. The Falcon 9 rocket on the launch pad at Cape Canaveral, Fla. Photo credit: SpaceXSpaceX launch director Ricky Lim informed the Falcon 9 launch team of the scrub at 3:39 p.m. EDT (1939 GMT), soon after crews finished loading kerosene and liquid oxygen propellant into the two-stage rocket."As folks heard on the anomaly net, we have encountered an issue that will result in a scrub of today's 4/14 launch attempt," Lim said. "The team here will start to safe the vehicle and offload propellants."The 208-foot-tall launcher was on track for liftoff at 4:58 p.m. EDT (2058 GMT) on SpaceX's third operational resupply run to the International Space Station. A Dragon cargo ship is mounted atop the rocket packed with approximately 2.4 tons of supplies, including fresh experiments, food, spare parts and other gear.SpaceX spokesperson Emily Shanklin said the problem was in the helium system on the Falcon 9's first stage. Helium is used to pressurize the rocket's propellant tanks and carries out several other functions during the terminal countdown and flight of the booster.Shanklin said the issue will be fixed in time for Friday's launch opportunity, which comes at 3:25 p.m. EDT (1925 GMT), the moment the space station's orbital plane crosses over the launch pad at Cape Canaveral.The weather outlook is iffy for Friday, with meteorologists calling for a 60 percent chance of violating the Falcon 9 rocket's weather rules.The mission can only launch on certain days to ensure the Dragon spacecraft can expeditiously rendezvous with the space station with time-sensitive experimental cargo.The Dragon spacecraft would complete an automated rendezvous with the space station early Sunday, with grapple by the lab's Canadian-built robotic arm expected around 7 a.m. EDT (1100 GMT).SpaceX is one of two companies contracted by NASA to deliver cargo to the space station. NASA signed a $1.6 billion contract for 12 resupply flights by SpaceX, and Orbital Sciences Corp. has a $1.9 billion deal for eight missions through 2016.NASA contracted with two commercial providers to ensure the station could receive cargo in the event one of the delivery vehicles was unable to fly.The Dragon spaceship's internal cabin is filled with 1,576 pounds of science and research gear, 1,049 pounds of crew provisions, 449 pounds of vehicle hardware, and 271 pounds of spacewalk tools.An unpressurized trunk section on the aft end of the Dragon spacecraft contains to NASA technology demonstration payloads: a high data-rate optical communications terminal named OPALS and a high-definition camera system to return videos of Earth.Monday's scrubbed countdown comes after several delays in launching the SpaceX cargo flight.Engineers discovered contamination on thermal blankets inside the Dragon's external cargo bay, prompting a delay from a planned March 16 launch date. SpaceX later determined the contamination would have no impact on the mission.Another launch opportunity in late March was missed after a U.S. Air Force range radar was damaged by a short-circuit, delaying the Falcon 9 launch and the liftoff of a United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket from Cape Canaveral.After the Air Force activated a backup radar, the Atlas 5 mission launched successfully April 10 and the SpaceX mission was retargeted for liftoff Monday.Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: .John Glenn Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The historic first orbital flight by an American is marked by this commemorative patch for John Glenn and Friendship 7.Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is available in our store. Get this piece of history!Celebrate the shuttle programFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This special commemorative patch marks the retirement of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch.Fallen Heroes Patch CollectionThe official patches from Apollo 1, the shuttle Challenger and Columbia crews are available in the store. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.SpaceX resupply mission set for flight to space station SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: April 13, 2014 SpaceX's Dragon supply ship is ready for takeoff from Cape Canaveral on Monday to add to the International Space Station's stockpiles of research experiments, crew provisions and gear to continue operating the 450-ton orbiting complex. The Falcon 9 rocket inside the SpaceX hangar at Cape Canaveral, Fla. Photo credit: SpaceXThe commercial cargo craft is scheduled for liftoff at 4:58 p.m. EDT (2058 GMT) Monday from Cape Canaveral's Complex 40 launch pad.A two-stage Falcon 9 rocket will boost the Dragon spacecraft into a circular 200-mile-high orbit, positioning the automated spaceship for pursuit of the space station culminating in a laser-guided final approach early Wednesday.Capture of the Dragon capsule with the space station's Canadian-built robotic arm is expected at 7:11 a.m. EDT (1111 GMT) Wednesday. The robot arm will maneuver the spacecraft to an attachment point on the station's Harmony module a few hours later.The flight is the third operational resupply run to the space station by SpaceX. It comes after two successful cargo missions in October 2012 and March 2013, which kicked off the execution of a $1.6 billion contract with NASA covering 12 logistics deliveries through 2016.Monday's launch was in doubt this weekend after a computer failure on the space station's central truss segment knocked out redundancy in the control path leading to several key systems, including the outpost's thermal control system, rotary joints to point power-generating solar arrays toward the sun, and the mobile transporter, a rail car designed to move the station's robotic arm along the backbone of the international research complex.But officials met on Sunday and approved SpaceX's launch to the space station, deferring a spacewalk to swap out the bad computer until later this month.Mike Suffredini, NASA's space station program manager, said Sunday they devised workarounds to regain the redundancy lost when the computer stopped responding to commands Friday.Officials weighed the minimized risk with the workarounds with problems that a further delay in the SpaceX launch could pose for the space station, including programmatic concerns with scheduling a busy slate of cargo and crew launches and the potential of dwindling foodstuffs aboard the outpost."There's a certain amount of urgency to go ahead and get these vehicles on ISS as soon as we safely can do that," Suffredini said.The Dragon spacecraft is set to deliver approximately 2.4 tons of cargo the space station, including 3,347 pounds of equipment packed inside the capsule's pressurized cabin.Technicians on Sunday planned to load nearly 1,000 pounds of time-sensitive items, including refrigerators packed with research samples that could spoil over time.The Dragon spacecraft launching Monday sports several upgrades over previous SpaceX cargo vehicles, nearly quadrupling the ship's capacity for powered cargo. The modifications include additional freezers for biological samples and redesigned cargo racks to accommodate additional payloads, according to SpaceX.The mission is also taking up research experiments in the Dragon's unpressurized trunk for the first time.The payload packages will be removed from the trunk using the space station's Canadian robotic arm and Dextre robot, a two-armed device fitted with grippers and a toolkit for handyman work outside the complex.NASA's Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science, or OPALS, will demonstrate a laser communications link between the space station and a ground antenna in Wrightwood, Calif. OPALS will test uplink and downlink capability through an optical beacon as the space station passes over the Wrightwood antenna, with each communications session expected to last about 100 seconds.Optical communications systems offer higher data transfer rates than achievable through conventional radio systems. OPALS is expected to run its experiments over a 90-day period while attached to a logistics carrier on the space station's truss. File photo of a Dragon spacecraft arriving at the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA"OPALS represents a tangible stepping stone for laser communications, and the International Space Station is a great platform for an experiment like this," said Michael Kokorowski, OPALS project manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. "Future operational laser communication systems will have the ability to transmit more data from spacecraft down to the ground than they currently do, mitigating a significant bottleneck for scientific investigations and commercial ventures."The High-Definition Earth Viewing camera suite will also launch inside the Dragon spacecraft and will be hosted on a platform on the exterior of the European Space Agency's Columbus laboratory module.Developed by engineers at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, the HDEV system includes four commercially available high-definition video cameras that will stream live video of Earth for online viewing, according to a NASA fact sheet.The experiment will help NASA determine what cameras work best in the harsh environment of space.The optical communications and high-definition video systems are the first large unpressurized NASA experiments assigned for delivery to the space station by SpaceX.Astronauts will manually remove items stowed inside the Dragon spacecraft's internal section, including 1,576 pounds of science and research gear, 1,049 pounds of crew provisions, 449 pounds of vehicle hardware, and 271 pounds of spacewalk tools.The Dragon will arrive with a fresh spacesuit for the space station's six-person crew, a space age garden to demonstrate vegetable growth in microgravity, and legs for Robonaut 2, a humanoid robot launched on a 2011 space shuttle mission.Suffredini said officials decided Saturday to add one more item to Dragon's payload manifest. A new gasket-like material was flown to Cape Canaveral to help astronauts when they mount a spacewalk later this month to replace the failed computer that threatened to delay the SpaceX resupply flight.The Dragon spacecraft is expected to remain attached to the space station until May, when it will be released by the robotic arm and return to Earth with a parachute-assisted splashdown in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Baja California.Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: .STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.SpaceX supply ship begins journey to space station SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: April 18, 2014 SpaceX's commercial Dragon supply ship thundered into orbit Friday to begin a two-day pursuit of the International Space Station, setting up the delivery of 2.4 tons of fresh supplies and experimental cargo to the 450-ton research complex Sunday. The Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Cape Canaveral, Fla. Photo credit: Walter Scriptunas II / The Dragon spacecraft, flying on SpaceX's third operational resupply run to the space station, lifted off at 3:25:21 p.m. EDT (1925:21 GMT) from Cape Canaveral's Complex 40 launch pad, initially rising slowly as its Falcon 9 rocket powered up to more than 1 million pounds of thrust.The launcher picked up speed, breaking the sound barrier about 70 seconds after liftoff and rocketing through the stratosphere before releasing its nine-engine first stage less than 3 minutes into the flight.The first stage fell away, leaving the upper stage's single Merlin 1D engine to accelerate the rocket and Dragon payload into orbit as the vehicle flew northeast from Cape Canaveral, paralleling the U.S. East Coast to reach the space station's exact orbital inclination.The 12-foot-diameter first stage was programmed to ignite its engines two times during its fall back into the Atlantic Ocean, slowing its velocity before deploying four landing legs made of carbon fiber and aluminum honeycomb.Monday's launch was the first Falcon 9 rocket to fly with landing legs.Elon Musk, SpaceX's CEO and chief designer, posted an update Friday night on Twitter saying the first stage made a good landing despite high waves in the recovery zone a few hundred miles northeast of Cape Canaveral."Data upload from tracking plane shows landing in Atlantic was good! Several boats enroute through heavy seas," Musk tweeted, adding a few minutes later that the first stage's flight computers continued transmitting for 8 seconds after reaching the water, an indication the rocket must have splashed down with minimal damage.SpaceX says the experimental first stage recovery is a stepping stone toward reusing the Falcon 9 rocket, which Musk says is critical for reducing the cost of space transportation.If the stage landed intact, it would mark the first time SpaceX has retrieved part of a Falcon rocket after launch. The Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Cape Canaveral, Fla., in this close-up view of the launcher's nine Merlin 1D first stage engines and landing legs. Photo credit: Walter Scriptunas II / While the first stage's return maneuvers garnered much attention during a post-flight press conference Friday, the mission's primary goal is to resupply the space station, reinforcing the orbiting outpost's dwindling food inventory and delivering fresh experiments for researchers."I'm feeling pretty excited," Musk told reporters in a telephone call from SpaceX headquarters in Hawthorne, Calif. "This is a happy day. Most important of all is that we did a good job for NASA ... Everything else is secondary to that."The mission is SpaceX's third resupply run to the space station, coming after successful flights in October 2012 and March 2013 to kick off the execution of a $1.6 billion logistics contract with NASA. Signed in December 2008, the deal covers 12 missions for the delivery of a cumulative 44,000 pounds of cargo to the space station.After reaching orbit Friday, the Dragon spaceship deployed from the Falcon 9's second stage about 10 minutes after liftoff, receding from the view of an on-board "rocketcam" backdropped by the muted blue colors of the ocean splashed against the stark blackness of space.The spacecraft automatically unfurled two power-generating solar arrays with a wingspan of 54 feet.SpaceX engineers initially ran into a problem with the Dragon spacecraft's propulsion system, causing the capsule to miss an appointed engine burn to set up for its two-day chase of the space station.But Musk said the glitch, traced to an isolation valve, was bypassed by the use of a backup valve and the cargo mission was on track to reach the space station early Sunday.Late Friday, the Dragon spacecraft opened its navigation bay door, exposing the ship's laser and thermal guidance sensors to be used in the final phase of its approach to the space station.Controllers plan a series of orbit-raising burns over the next day-and-a-half, leading to the arrival of Dragon in the vicinity of the complex in the predawn hours Sunday, U.S. time. File photo of a Dragon spacecraft approaching the International Space Station on a previous mission. Photo credit: NASAThe spaceship will approach the space station from below, eventually pausing about 30 feet beneath the complex while astronauts Koichi Wakata and Rick Mastracchio snare Dragon with a robotic arm.Grapple is scheduled for 7:14 a.m. EDT (1114 GMT) to wrap up a 40-hour rendezvous that began with the Falcon 9 rocket's launch Friday.The Dragon spacecraft launched Friday sports several upgrades over previous SpaceX cargo vehicles, nearly quadrupling the ship's capacity for powered cargo. The modifications include additional freezers for biological samples and redesigned cargo racks to accommodate additional payloads, according to SpaceX.The mission is also taking up research experiments in the Dragon's unpressurized trunk for the first time. The passengers include a NASA optical communications terminal to demonstrate high data-rate links between the space station and the ground, along with a high-definition camera suite to collect videos of Earth.The payload packages will be mounted outside the space station by the lab's Canadian-built robotics system.Astronauts will manually remove items stowed inside the Dragon spacecraft's internal section, including 1,576 pounds of science and research gear, 1,049 pounds of crew provisions, 449 pounds of vehicle hardware, and 271 pounds of spacewalk tools.The Dragon will arrive with a fresh spacesuit for the space station's six-person crew, a space age garden to demonstrate vegetable growth in microgravity, and legs for Robonaut 2, a humanoid robot launched on a 2011 space shuttle mission.The space station will repack the Dragon spacecraft's pressurized module with experiment samples and other hardware destined to return to Earth. Dragon's departure and splashdown in the Pacific Ocean is scheduled for May 18.Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: .STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.SpaceX supply ship unloaded by robots and astronauts SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: May 5, 2014 The International Space Station's Dextre robot plucked a high-tech laser communications terminal from the trunk of a Dragon commercial cargo craft Monday, completing two weeks of unpacking the SpaceX supply ship's 4,600 pounds of experiments and provisions. The Dextre robot is pictured near the Dragon spacecraft. Photo credit: NASAThe cargo freighter's supply load included materials stowed inside its pressurized cabin and mounted in a rear trunk, an external logistics platform designed to carry large experimental packages and spare parts for operations outside the space station.The Dragon spacecraft arrived at the space station April 20, two days after launching on top of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The unmanned cargo ship is the third operational vehicle SpaceX has sent to the space station under a $1.6 billion contract with NASA.The space station's astronauts were charged with removing the gear packed inside the Dragon's internal cargo hold. The job of unloading the capsule's trunk fell to the outpost's Canadian-built robotics system.The crew last week finished transferring cargo from the Dragon spacecraft's pressurized section, totaling 1,576 pounds of science and research equipment supporting more than 150 experiments, 1,049 pounds of crew supplies, 449 pounds of vehicle hardware, and 271 pounds of spacewalk tools, including a fresh spacesuit.Among the items were legs for the space station's Robonaut 2 humanoid robot, a research investigation aimed at demonstrating vegetable growth in a habitat aboard the complex, and an experiment funded by the National Institutes of Health seeking to identify the cause of a suppressed immune system during long-duration space missions. Scientists say the research could help treat auto-immune diseases like arthritis and diabetes.The Dragon's cargo delivery also replenished dwindling food stockpiles on the space station.For the first time, SpaceX hauled technological experiments inside the Dragon spacecraft's external trunk: the High-Definition Earth Viewing payload and the Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science, or HDEV and OPALS.The space station's Dextre robot -- a 12-foot-tall, two-armed device with a toolkit for myriad repair and maintenance tasks -- moved the HDEV camera suite to a mounting plate on the European Columbus lab module May 1.The camera system was activated and started transmitting high-quality views outside the space station May 2. You can watch live video from the HDEV camera system .Developed by engineers at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, the HDEV system includes four commercially available high-definition video cameras to stream live video of Earth for online viewing, according to a NASA fact sheet.The experiment will help NASA determine what cameras work best in the harsh environment of space.On Monday, Dextre was again at work, this time pulling OPALS from Dragon's cargo bay. Artist's concept of the OPALS payload's laser experiments on the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASAA minor misalignment prevented Dextre from removing OPALS from the Dragon spacecraft last week, but a software patch uploaded to the space station resolved the problem. Attached to the end of the space station's 57-foot-long robotic arm, Dextre backed away from the Dragon spacecraft Monday with the OPALS payload in its grip.The schedule calls for ground controllers to relocate the robot arm Tuesday while OPALS remains in the clutch of Dextre. Final mounting of the laser communications box on an external logistics carrier is set for Wednesday.The robotics operations are commanded by U.S. and Canadian engineers at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston.The optical communications payload will demonstrate high-speed data links between the space station and a ground station in Wrightwood, Calif., near Los Angeles.When the space station flies overhead, OPALS will send a pre-formatted video to the ground station via laser beam. Lasers offer a much faster way of transmitting large data files than conventional radio systems, potentially by a factor of 10 to 100, according to NASA.OPALS was designed and built at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.Matt Abrahamson, OPALS mission manager at JPL, said Monday the downlink experiments should begin by early June, after several commissioning tests over the next few weeks. The planned mission duration is 90 days."OPALS was constructed from commercial off-the-shelf parts that degrade with time in the radiation environment we expect at the space station," Abrahamson said. "Our plan is to achieve our mission goal to downlink enhanced-definition videos to the optical ground station during that 90-day timeframe."Astronauts inside the space station have begun refilling the Dragon capsule with equipment assigned for return to Earth. Approximately 1.8 tons of hardware and experiment samples will be inside the Dragon spacecraft when it splashes down in the Pacific Ocean on May 18.Release of the Dragon spacecraft by the space station's robot arm is set for May 18 at about 9:30 a.m. EDT (1330 GMT). Splashdown is scheduled for 3:05 p.m. EDT (1905 GMT) about 300 nautical miles west of Baja California, where recovery boats will await the capsule.Follow Stephen Clark on Twitter: .STS-134 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Endeavour is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-134. Available in our store!Final Shuttle Mission PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The crew emblem for the final space shuttle mission is now available in our store. Get this piece of history!Apollo CollageThis beautiful one piece set features the Apollo program emblem surrounded by the individual mission logos.STS-133 PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!The final planned flight of space shuttle Discovery is symbolized in the official embroidered crew patch for STS-133. Available in our store!Anniversary Shuttle PatchFree shipping to U.S. addresses!This embroidered patch commemorates the 30th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Program. The design features the space shuttle Columbia's historic maiden flight of April 12, 1981.Mercury anniversaryFree shipping to U.S. addresses!Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alan Shephard's historic Mercury mission with this collectors' item, the official commemorative embroidered patch. | | | | 2014 Spaceflight Now Inc.SpaceX targets Falcon 9 launch on Monday SPACEFLIGHT NOWPosted: July 11, 2014 After a string of technical and weather-related delays, SpaceX engineers in Cape Canaveral are targeting liftoff of a Falcon 9 rocket Monday with six machine-to-machine Orbcomm communications satellites designed to refresh the company's data relay network in low Earth orbit. SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket on the launch pad for the Orbcomm OG2 mission. Credit: SpaceXThe satellites will help Orbcomm clients track ships, trucks, cargo containers, remote oil and gas infrastructure, weather buoys, research stations and other assets.Liftoff is set for 9:21 a.m. EDT (1321 GMT) from Cape Canaveral's Complex 40 launch pad. The launch window extends to 11:54 a.m. EDT (1554 GMT).SpaceX completed a customary prelaunch engine firing on the launch pad Friday, igniting the Falcon 9 rocket's nine Merlin 1D first stage engines for about three seconds.The 22-story rocket was held down on the launch pad during the test, which occurred at the end of a practice countdown that included fueling of the launcher with rocket-grade kerosene fuel, liquid oxygen and helium pressurant.The engines collectively produce up to 1.3 million pounds of thrust and fire for nearly three minutes during launch.Officials will review data from the static engine firing before clearing the Falcon 9 rocket for liftoff.The launch was scheduled for May, but SpaceX encountered a helium leak during a preflight test, triggering a month-long delay. Concerns with one of the Orbcomm satellites kept the mission grounded for an extra few days before SpaceX mounted its first launch attempt June 20.The launch team aborted the June 20 countdown after detecting an unexpected drop in pressure in one the rocket's second stage propellant tanks. A source told Spaceflight Now the problem was traced to a valve in a liquid oxygen tank.Another launch attempt June 21 was thwarted by lightning at Cape Canaveral, and SpaceX called off a planned liftoff June 22 to evaluate a steering actuator on the rocket's second stage engine.SpaceX rescheduled the launch for July 14 to give ground crews time to resolve the issues that prevented liftoff in June. The slip to mid-July also allowed the U.S. Air Force to complete previously scheduled maintenance activities on the Eastern Range, which provides safety, tracking and communications services for all launches from Cape Canaveral.The Orbcomm satellites will be released from a mounting ring, supplied by Moog Inc., atop the Falcon 9 rocket's second stage in a choreographed 20-minute sequence once the launcher's 10 Merlin engines finish their propulsive work.The first of the six Orbcomm OG2 satellites, built by Sierra Nevada Corp., will deploy nearly 15 minutes after liftoff. The spacecraft are programmed to release at preset times until the final satellite flies off the rocket about 35 minutes into the flight.The first opportunity to communicate with the spacecraft comes about an hour-and-a-half after launch during a pass over California, officials said. The satellites will also extend their power-generating solar panels and communications antennas.Monday's flight is the first act in a two-launch, 17-satellite deployment by SpaceX and Orbcomm this year. Orbcomm officials say the company's investment in the second-generation satellite fleet, which replaces the company's aging spacecraft already in orbit, is worth approximately $230 million. A technicians works on an Orbcomm OG2 satellite at its factory in Louisville, Colo. Credit: Sierra Nevada Corp.About $70 million in assets are aboard Friday's launch, according to Robert Constantini, Orbcomm's chief financial officer.Orbcomm is paying SpaceX $42.6 million for the two launches, a discount from the approximately $60 million per launch price advertised on SpaceX's website.Most of Orbcomm's existing first-generation, or OG1, satellites were launched more than 15 years ago. They have operated years longer than designed, officials said.The satellites offer two-way data links to help customers remotely track, monitor and control transportation and logistics assets, heavy equipment, oil and gas infrastructure, ships and buoys, and government-owned equipment, according to Orbcomm's website.Founded by Orbital Sciences Corp. in 1993, Orbcomm Inc. was spun off as an independent company in 2001.Marc Eisenberg, CEO of Orbcomm, said being so close to launch is a "pretty amazing feeling, considering we started financing the constellation in 2005."Orbcomm's 889,000 subscribers will rapidly see benefits from the launch, including reductions in the time it takes to transfer messages. Full exploitation of the OG2 system's upgrades, such as 24-hour near real-time service, larger message capacities, and greater geographic coverage, will come after Orbcomm's next 11 satellites launch later this year."A good way to look at it is six satellites give you OG2 coverage about 8 hours a day," Eisenberg said. "And then the other 16 hours a day, you've got OG1 coverage."Orbcomm decided to put six satellites on its first launch with SpaceX for a few reasons, according to Eisenburg. Six satellites will sufficiently fill Orbcomm's coverage gaps, and it allows ground controllers more time to focus on each spacecraft during post-launch commissioning."Our No. 1 goal is to fulfill the mission objective, and the mission objective is to fill the hole in the sky and bring the average message down significantly," Eisenberg said in an interview. "You need a minimum of five to fulfill the mission objective. You want to go a little more than give because you want to take one of those spacecraft and start drifting it to get a feel for how that works."It also eases insurance worries, Eisenberg said. Insurance companies charged a higher rate for the first launch than the second flight, when officials expect the risk of of a launch or spacecraft failure will be mitigated by the experience with the first mission.The first Orbcomm OG2 satellite was lost on a SpaceX Falcon 9 launch in October 2012, which suffered a first stage engine failure and burned more propellant than planned to make up for the mishap.The 2012 launch achieved its primary purpose of delivering SpaceX's Dragon supply ship to the International Space Station, but there was not enough fuel to put the Orbcomm secondary payload in the correct orbit.The rocket released the spacecraft in a lower-than-planned orbit, but officials said engineers were able to unfurl the satellite's solar panel and antenna, demonstrating two of the craft's riskiest post-launch milestones. The satellite burned up in Earth's atmosphere after three days in orbit.Although it was not a factor in the decision, launching just six of the oven-sized satellites on the Falcon 9 rocket also gives SpaceX plenty of margin to try to recover the booster's first stage in the Atlantic Ocean a few hundred miles northeast of Cape Canaveral.The Falcon 9's first stage, fitted with four carbon fiber and aluminum honeycomb landing legs, will reignite its engines after completing its job to boost the Orbcomm satellites into space.While the launcher's second stage continues firing to put the satellites in orbit, the first stage will autonomously fly itself back to Earth, reducing its velocity before falling into the sea. Recovery crews stationed near the landing zone will attempt to retrieve the stage intact.SpaceX wants to eventually fly its rocket boosters back to the launch site for reuse.The first stage from the Falcon 9's previous launch in April splashed down in the Atlantic as designed, but rough seas prevented crews from getting to the rocket before it was destroyed by waves."This time, we're going to have much more capable boats," Elon Musk, SpaceX's founder and CEO, told reporters in April. "We kind of got unlucky in that we landed the stage in the middle of a storm. It will also be landing in the water much closer to land than last time, so I think hopefully we'll avoid some of the deep ocean st
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The Museum of Geometric and MADI Art, 319 Carlisle St. in Dallas, will present a Young People’s Workshop of Islamic Art from 2 to 5 p.m. Free. 214-855-7802.
2014-12-15 06:38:01

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